A recent article referred to me as “America’s plus-size sweetheart.” It’s like I’m managing to achieve all this success in spite of my affliction. I always find that interesting, because it’s like, would you ever do that to a male comedian considered overweight? Would you ever put that in the headline for a male star? I feel like it would never happen. And it’s not that it’s not a fact about me, but I don’t know what the obsession is with pointing it out. Because when that happens, I do feel like someone is saying, “Well, good for her, she’s doing well despite her troubled blah blah blah…” It blows my mind. My weight? It is what it is. Like most people, I know, it’s like, you gain a little, you lose a little. You have a good hair year, a bad hair year, you manage money well, you don’t manage it that well… your entire life ebbs and flows and ups and downs. And you could get hit by a bus tomorrow. It’s about being content. And sometimes other priorities win.

There’s so much more to her than her weight. She is so talented and beautiful and I hope she never forgets that.

pussybow:

onthesideoftheotters:

bodysexgender:

vexednature:

tuxedoandex:

modernvampiresofnewyork:

What girls look for in guys

  • brown eyes
  • messy hair
  • cute nose
  • 4 paws
  • golden retriever 

but a man looking for a certain thing in girls? misogyny right? guys can’t be like “I look for girls who wear glasses and are thin and like to talk” nope that’s misogyny and it’s horrible. “equality”

oh my god did you even bother reading the post -______-

"not ALL dogs"

m’owner

Happy birthday to my dear friend, Ingrid (aka @losercitylady)! You are the bee’s knees and I hope you have an amazing day!

Happy birthday to my dear friend, Ingrid (aka @losercitylady)! You are the bee’s knees and I hope you have an amazing day!

pgdigs:

1977: The end of West View Park

When school picnics were a tradition, there were two places where the station wagon would take kids of the district: Kennywood or West View Park. 

But Pittsburghers’ fondness for West View Park dwindled in 1977 and the Route 19 park closed forever after 71 years of operation. 

"The directors blamed rising costs and reduced attendance as the reasons <…> The park was opened for only 80 days in 1977 because of the lack of school picnics," the Post-Gazette reported.

Jack Hickey, who used to sell tickets and arrange picnics at the park blamed the closing of the park on the cultural change: “It’s not the park, it’s the people that have changed. This is a picnic park, where families can pack a lunch and stay all day. But people just don’t do that anymore,” he said.

West View Park was more than just a picnic park, though. It had  famous rides like “The Whip” and “Tumblebug,” “Scrambler” and “Tempest.” In fact, in 1910, four years after park’s grand opening, Pittsburgh native T.M. Harton, the founder and original owner of the park, unveiled the Dips, the first coaster in Pennsylvania to have dips and drops over 50 feet. 

The park was a happy place: laughter, plenty of entertainment, lots of screaming and even dancing.  West View Park was home to West View Danceland, a dance hall, with music, flashing lights and the big crystal ball that illuminated the dancing floor. People danced there to big bands music, rock groups, jazz musicians and records. But then in 1973 it was turned into ashes overnight. The famous dance hall that hosted Guy Lombardo, Harry James, Glenn Miller and Tommy Dorsey was leveled by an eight alarm fire and was never rebuilt. 

Some would say that Danceland’s fire was a turning point, things went downhill from there and financial woes of West View Park worsened. 

In November 1977, everything inside the amusement park went up for sale: the choo-choo train, distortion mirrors, the 40 “Fascination” games, lots of coasters and even the handcrafted merry-go-round built in 1906. 

Since 1981, the grounds of West View Park have been occupied by the West View Park Shopping Center, offering a different kind of American entertainment.

On the day when West View Park closed its doors never to reopen them again, the Post-Gazette wrote: “In the deafening quiet that has shrouded the place, there seems to be nothing sadder than a merry-go-round fenced off with aluminum chain link, a boarded up cotton candy stand or an entire abandoned amusement park.”

Check out this video showing what it was like to have fun at West View Park (h/t John Schalcosky).

— Mila Sanina

I wish I could have gone there, but I was just a glimmer in my mama’s eye whrn West View Park was torn down.

pgdigs:

1974: Same-sex couples fight for their right to marry

The news on Tuesday of a federal judge striking down Pennyslvania’s ban on same-sex marriages spurred us to look into Pittsburgh’s history of gay and lesbian equality.

Perhaps inequality is the better word. The Post-Gazette’s archive contains only one relevant folder on the subject — “Homosexuals” — and it’s largely filled with images of protesters.

Historically, same-sex couples have had little to be happy about.

Legislation banning discrimination against homosexuals had first been proposed in Pittsburgh City Council on June 15, 1974, at the behest of a local gay rights group called Gay Alternatives Pittsburgh (GAP).

For a long time, nothing happened.

Years of appeals and slowly rising acceptance across the nation pushed Pittsburgh’s City Council to reconsider.

While running for mayor, Sophie Masloff was against gay rights legislation. 

Masloff faced judgement for that decision before becoming mayor, or rather, for her behind-the-scenes actions opposing gay rights legislation in 1988.

Cry Out, a gay rights organization in Pittsburgh, protested and picketed Masloff’s house after her election as mayor.

Gay pride celebrations continued in Pittsburgh — attempts to spur legislation passage — and they eventually made an impact.

In 1990, Mayor Sophie Masloff signed a gay rights amendment into the city’s Human Relations Act,  which made it illegal to “discriminate in housing, employment or public accommodations based on sexual orientation — defined as ‘male or female homosexuality, heterosexuality or bisexuality or perceived homosexuality, heterosexuality or bisexuality.’”

Her move to ban hiring discrimination was not exactly a bold move. Mayor Richard Caliguiri had already outlawed sexual discrimination in hiring in 1978. Then-Pittsburgh Press columnist Brian O’Neill wrote, “The news of Sophie’s choice was displayed in the newspapers Tuesday, but to the casual observer, it was a non-story.”

And now, in 2014, gay couples in Pittsburgh and across Pennsylvania can marry — just like anyone else.

Golzar Meamar

ridesabike:

Elaine Stritch rests her bike, reads a note, almost causes a riot.      
NEW YORK, June 26—TOLD TO KEEP HER SHIRT ON – Blonde Elaine Stritch, understudy to Ethel Merman in the Broadway hit, “Call Me Madam,” wears halter and shorts which cause her arrest in Central Park. Today she was fined $1 and told by Magistrate Emilio Jones, “A beautiful girl like you could cause a small riot and cause a large crowd to collect by removing your shirt.” “Well,” she replied, “I was there all day and nothing happened.” (AP, 1951)

ridesabike:

Elaine Stritch rests her bike, reads a note, almost causes a riot.      

NEW YORK, June 26—TOLD TO KEEP HER SHIRT ON – Blonde Elaine Stritch, understudy to Ethel Merman in the Broadway hit, “Call Me Madam,” wears halter and shorts which cause her arrest in Central Park. Today she was fined $1 and told by Magistrate Emilio Jones, “A beautiful girl like you could cause a small riot and cause a large crowd to collect by removing your shirt.” “Well,” she replied, “I was there all day and nothing happened.” (AP, 1951)

pgdigs:

A quiet September day in 1969 at South Hills High School turned chaotic when roughly 100 out-of-state “hippie type” girls, as described by the Pittsburgh Press, rolled up in cars to stage a Vietnam War protest.

“Jail break! Shut down the school!” they urged in an attempt to get students to leave class and join the anti-war movement.   

The girls, waving Viet Cong flags, went as far as to punch teachers and run around half naked before fleeing the school grounds.

Twenty teens were arrested, though officials remained unsure why South Hills was targeted for the demonstration.

Pittsburgh’s anti-war demonstrations did not garner the same numbers as those in Washington, New York, or San Francisco, but that doesn’t mean Steel City residents were silent about their thoughts on the war in Vietnam.

Thousands of Pittsburghers spoke out in various ways throughout the 1960s and early ‘70s, organizing marches and protests in downtown Pittsburgh and local college campuses.

As reflected in letters to the editor printed in The Pittsburgh Press, Pittsburgh natives serving in Vietnam had mixed reactions to the demonstrations taking place both here and throughout America.

“What has irritated me and many others are Americans protesting against our being here and publicly demonstrating,” PFC Chester Austin Jr. wrote from Vietnam.  He, like other soldiers, commended Pittsburgh for not speaking out against the war as actively as other American cities, but he was still disturbed by American anti-war sentiment.

Not all demonstrators took an anti-war stand. Protesters often found themselves in standoffs with those determined to express their admiration and support for troops abroad.

The largest rallies took place in 1969, where thousands took to the streets Downtown during the evening rush hour with hopes of attracting much attention.

Professors, housewives, students without beards, and veterans made appearances at all of these rallies, showing that young “hippie types” — like those at South Hills High School — were not the only ones spearheading anti-war protests in and around Pittsburgh.

Emily Kaplan

Yayoi Kusama, Infinity Dots Mirrored Room, 1996

Here in Pittsburgh. At the Mattress Factory. 💛💛💛

Fanny- Blind Alley

Big hair game ways from a year ago. Ha

Big hair game ways from a year ago. Ha

My goils and me! @pussybow @erin.thomas

My goils and me! @pussybow @erin.thomas

Happy birthday to my dear friend, Molly aka @velvettangerine! I wish I could be there or at least smash Pittsburgh next to San Francisco for a day or few… or most! Love ya!

Happy birthday to my dear friend, Molly aka @velvettangerine! I wish I could be there or at least smash Pittsburgh next to San Francisco for a day or few… or most! Love ya!